How to Create a Teams Meeting in Outlook

outlook logo

Now that working from home is the norm, video conferences are becoming the de facto way to meet. Here’s how to create Microsoft Teams meetings directly from within Outlook, without having to book them through the Teams app.

To create Teams meetings from within Outlook—either Outlook Online and the Outlook client—you need to install the Teams client on your computer. This will install an add-in to Outlook that provides a new option when you’re creating a meeting. Add-ins that you install in the Outlook client are automatically added to Outlook Online and vice versa. Once you’ve installed the Teams app, the add-in should be available in both clients.

These options should be available for all users of Outlook and Teams, regardless of whether you have a paid Office 365 (O365)/Microsoft 365 (M365) subscriptions. However, they’re only available for email accounts that use Exchange, whether that’s a free Outlook.com/live.com/hotmail account, or a paid Microsoft account for your own domain. If you’re using a non-Exchange account, such as a Gmail or Yahoo account, the Teams add-in won’t work for you.

We’ll take you through installing the Teams client first. If you have installed the client and you still can’t see these options, we’ve got some troubleshooting suggestions as well.

Install the Teams Client

The quickest way to get the Teams client is to open Teams online. On the first page, you’ll be offered the chance to download the Teams client.

The "Get the Windows app" button in Teams online.

If you already have Teams online open, click on the app download option at the bottom of the left sidebar.

The "App download" button in Teams online.

Install the .exe file, and log in with your O365/M365 account details when requested. To make sure the add-in is installed in Outlook, restart Teams, then restart Outlook.

Follow the instructions below to use the add-in in the Outlook client and in Outlook Online. If it’s not available, follow these troubleshooting tips from Microsoft.

Create a Teams Meeting in the Outlook Client

When you install the Teams client on your computer, it will install an add-in to Outlook that provides a new option when you’re creating a meeting. The option is available in the Home > New Items menu.

The "Teams Meeting" option in Outlook's "New Items" menu.

It’s also available in the ribbon of a new Meeting request.

The "Teams Meeting" option in a new meeting request.

When you click one of these options, the meeting request will change to include a location of “Microsoft Teams Meeting” and a link in the body of the request that attendees can click on to join the meeting.

A Teams meeting request.

Create a Teams Meeting in Outlook Online

When you install the Teams client on your computer, it will install an add-in to Outlook that provides a new option when you’re creating a meeting. In Outlook Online, the option is available in the meeting request.

The "Teams meeting" toggle switch in an Outlook Online meeting request.

Toggle the setting on to make it a Teams meeting. Unlike Teams meetings you create in the Outlook client, nothing changes in the Outlook Online meeting request, but once you’ve sent the meeting request, the Teams link will appear in the event in your calendar.

An event in the Outlook Online calendar showing the Teams meeting link.

For both Outlook Online and the Outlook client, fill in the attendees and the date and time of the meeting as usual. Send the meeting request the same way that you would with a normal meeting. The only difference is that you and your attendees will join the meeting in Teams, rather than a meeting room in an office.

Article by Rob Woodgate from How-to-geek.

Mobile Security Datasheet

Mobile Security Datasheet

Flexible support network


With the rise of the mobile workforce, the need to minimize security risks like device theft, data accessibility, and malware attacks is also increasing. Also, the sophistication of today’s security threats require a comprehensive approach that keeps your business devices, networks, and data protected.

USER ACCESS CONTROL

Lenovo’s user access control technology protects the organization’s devices and business ensuring only the right people have access to it.

  • Multi Factor Authentication (MFA) – For User Identity Protection
  • IR Camera with Windows Hello – For Simple and Secure Facial Login
  • Smart Card Access – For Two-factor Authentication in One Step
  • Near Field Communication (NFC) – For Rapid Contactless Authentication

PORT AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION

Whether in the office or on the go, end user computing devices need protection not only at the software level but also at a physical level. Built-in port security features help protect against physical theft of data via the USB and other access ports on company PCs.

  • ThinkShutter Camera Privacy – For Privacy When You Need It
  • Kensington® Cable Lock – For Preventing Device Theft
  • ThinkPad Ultra Dock – For Innovative Dock and Device Security

DATA PROTECTION

To keep the business running smoothly and without disruption, it is essential to have secure, automatic, and efficient data backup. Lenovo’s robust data protection tools enable easy and efficient data recovery and retrieval only by authorized personnel.

  • Fast Identity Online (FIDO) – For Robust Data Protection
  • Discrete Trusted Platform Module (dTPM) 2.0 – For Data Encryption
  • Online Data Backup (OLDB) – For Safeguarding Your Critical Data
  • Hard Drive Retention – For Retaining Sensitive Company Data
  • BUFFERZONE® – For Sophisticated and Supreme Malware Protection
  • Mobile Device Management

 DOWNLOAD DATASHEET 


Working from Home

Working from home is becoming more common as Australians self-isolate against COVID-19. Here are some ways to help make it feel more normal.

  1. Stay Focused and outline your task for the day – It’s tempting to sleep-in and stay in your Pj’s, but you’ll be more productive if you get up and stick to normal working hours and task schedule that you would normally do during work hours.
  2. Stay Healthy, Move and take breaks – Because you can work at all times, doesn’t mean you should. Eat well and take time to head outdoors for brief stroll or exercise.
  3. Stay Connected Via Internet and have remote access to work files and colleagues – You may not realise it, but a big part of your day job is the social connection you get at the office. That’s why it’s important to make sure you stay in touch with colleagues virtually, or via chat like Microsoft teams to keep your work moving forward.

PC Madness provides a whole range of cloud services to our clients to help them access there work files / server from home. If your business or work has not implemented any cloud system such a remote server / team file-sharing and having cloud phone system give us a call to discuss how we can help you. Working in the cloud mean you can work from anywhere and due to this pandemic crisis the world is facing at the moment a system like this can keep your business moving forward.

John
PC Madness Pty Ltd
08 9250 4554

VPN (virtual private network)

A person touching a tablet with a blue glow on their finger and VPN text overlayed

Wright Studio/Shutterstock.com

A VPN (virtual private network) service is a great way to ensure you have a secure network connection while online. It also allows you to protect your browsing history, torrent, and access content that is blocked or regionally restricted.

What Does a VPN Do?

Each of your devices (your computer, smartphone, etc.) have their own unique IP address, which tells services who, what, and where you are. A VPN sits in between your device and however it connects to the internet, spoofing your device’s IP address. Anything you do online goes first through the VPN, then to the router, causing your router (and everything outside of your device) to think you have a different identity.

VPNs are great to have when you are planning on hopping online over an unsecured connection (a network that does not ask you for a password), like at a cafe, as it keeps your information (such as your browsing history and any data you transfer) safe from prying eyes. A VPN offers other benefits, like accessing content that may be restricted geographically, as they allow you to interact with the internet as though you were doing so from the VPN’s location, not your own. You can do a variety of other things with a VPN as well, including access your work or home network while traveling, bypass internet censorship, and download files.

What to Look for in a VPN Service

If you need to use a VPN, it’s easy enough to get started: simply choose a service, sign up on the company’s site, and download the client. Here are a few things to look for when picking a VPN.

  • Lots of Servers: The more servers a VPN has, the faster your connection speeds are and, typically, the more country connection options you’ll have. This means you likely won’t have to deal with buffering or throttling issues.
  • High Simultaneous Connections: If you need to connect more than one of your devices to your VPN at the same time, more power to you. The best VPN services allow you to connect five of your devices simultaneously, if not more.
  • Great Ease of Use: For those who are new to VPNs, having a clean and clearly abeled interface, as well as easy access to customer support, is what’s important. For veteran users, this may mean an app that’s configurable and loaded with extras like a kill switch, data compression (for mobile), and automatic HTTPS redirection.
  • Excellent Security, and No Logging: Good VPN services won’t monitor, log, or sell any of your personal info, like which websites you visit. They also ensure they are protecting you with strong encryption (AES 256-bit) and regular security audits. This is a surprisingly hard thing to find out about most VPNs, too, which is why we’ve made sure you can trust all the picks on our list.

Article by SUZANNE HUMPHRIES from review geek.

Windows 10’s New Start Menu May Kill Live Tiles Forever

windows-10x-start
The new Start menu in Windows 10X on a foldable device.
Microsoft

Microsoft hasn’t officially announced it yet, but the writing is on the wall: Windows 10’s live tiles are going away. Windows 10X has a new Start menu without live tiles, and we expect it to arrive on all versions of Windows 10.

Windows 10X Has a Start Menu Without Live Tiles

Windows 10X in Microsoft's new emulator
Microsoft

Windows 10X is the canary in the coal mine. This new version of Windows 10 is designed for dual-screen devices, but that’s not all it is. Windows 10X is a modern version of Windows 10 that runs applications in containers. Beyond that, it includes a new, simplified interface.

That simplified interface includes a new Start menu. Rather than featuring live tiles, it provides a simplified list of your installed applications. It’s a grid-based view with icons rather than tiles.

Windows 10X is still in development and hasn’t been released yet. Microsoft is clearly using it as a test platform for a simplified desktop interface, and the new Start menu is a part of that.

Really, let’s be honest: Microsoft is creating a new Windows 10 interface for folding tablets. Live tiles are clearly more useful on a tablet than a desktop PC. If Microsoft doesn’t think live tiles are a good fit for a modern tablet, why would it keep using live tiles on the standard desktop version of Windows 10?

Windows 10’s New Icons Aren’t Designed for Live Tiles

Windows mail icons over time.
Microsoft

Microsoft announced a set of new icons for Windows 10 on Feb. 20, 2020. The new icons ditch the flat, one-color aesthetic pioneered by Windows 8 and offer more color and complexity. Here’s how Microsoft’s Christina Koehn explains how Microsoft wants to make its icons more consistent across various platforms:

Flat, monochrome icons look great in context of colorful tiles, but as more icon styles enter the ecosystem, this approach needs to evolve.

The new icons in the latest development versions of Windows 10 don’t really fit. Rather than use your system accent color, as existing live tiles do, these new tiles always use a blue background color. After all, they wouldn’t look good on some background colors.

These icons just look much better on a Windows 10X-style icon grid than a Windows 8-style set of tiles.

Cody Carson@hologei

Microsoft has started updating the system app icons for Windows Insiders. The new ones don’t use your system accent color, and look pretty out of place in the current start menu. Perhaps the 10X start menu could make its way over to desktop sooner rather than later.

View image on Twitter

Live Tiles Are Already Just Glorified Shortcuts (Mostly)

Live tiles were supposed to be a quick way of accessing information without opening an application. They originally appeared on Windows Phone, adding more information to the application shortcuts on your home screen.

In Windows 8, your Start screen took up your entire display. Live tiles were designed to transform that Start screen from a simple application launcher into a useful dashboard. You could see the weather, incoming emails, recent messages, news headlines, other status information right on each application’s tile without opening the app.

Today, Windows 10 displays all the applications you pin to your Start menu in a grid of tiles. Most applications don’t bother displaying status information in their tiles. For most people, those tiles are just shortcuts you click or tap to open an application.

Goodbye, Live Tiles

Windows 10’s next update, also known as Windows 10 version 2004 or 20H1, is expected for release sometime around May 2020. That update is nearly done, so we don’t expect to see any major Start menu changes there.

However, we wouldn’t be surprised to see Microsoft ditch live tiles for icons in late 2020 (with the 20H2 update) or in 2021. That will give Microsoft time to fine-tune the new icon-based interface in Windows 10X before rolling it out to all Windows 10 PCs.

Windows Latest reports that “people familiar with the development” said “Microsoft is planning to replace live tiles with icons in a future update after Windows 10’s 20H2 release.” Whether or not that particular rumor is true, the writing is on the wall. Most Windows 10 users don’t use live tiles and Microsoft is clearly planning for a future without them.

We already saw a leaked version of this Start menu appear in desktop builds of Windows 10 back in July 2019. The leaked version is clearly an early work-in-progress, but it already fits Windows 10’s desktop much better than the current Start menu does.

Leaked Windows 10 Start menu without live tiles
@NTAuthority on Twitter

Written by Chris Hoffman. Taken from How-To Geek site. 

4 myths about PC tech small businesses need to reject

By Emporia State University | The Bulletin.

The PCs you choose to power your small business can dramatically impact your company’s productivity and competitiveness. However, many small businesses fall for common myths about computers, leading to poor purchasing decisions.

Here are four myths about PCs – and realities to help you make smarter technology decisions for your business.

Myth 1: Consumer PCs are interchangeable with business PCs

Reality: Because they’re built for activities like watching videos, checking email and surfing the web, PCs for the consumer market will not always have the computing power or security features sophisticated business applications demand. If a family laptop reluctantly boots up or crashes, it’s annoying, but not serious.

PCs for the consumer market will not always have the computing power or security features sophisticated business applications demand.

For a business, however, computers are mission-critical. Employees are more likely to run multiple applications simultaneously, use resource-heavy applications or use software as a service (SaaS). PCs built for consumers often lack the computing power to handle these tasks – resulting in lost productivity.

Consumer-level PCs may also lack built-in security features of computers designed for businesses, which could make your business – and sensitive customer data – vulnerable to cyberattacks.

Myth 2: RAM is the top factor in computer performance

Reality: Adding more random access memory usually allows a computer to manage more data. But RAM alone won’t improve a computer’s performance – unless the PC has sufficient processing power. To make a PC faster and more efficient, you need a powerful central processing unit to optimise the RAM. While RAM is the memory, the CPU (or processor) is the computer’s “brain,” receiving instructions, performing calculations and processing information. To run today’s resource-intensive business software efficiently, look for computers with plenty of RAM, plus processing power.

Myth 3: You can wait until PCs fail before replacing them

Reality: Long before a PC fails, its performance may suffer, costing your business time and money. Waiting for an older PC to start up every day can waste up to 11 hours a year. Crashing, freezing or slow computers can keep your employees from working efficiently, and may appear unprofessional to customers or clients. Sluggish, malfunctioning PCs can reduce employee satisfaction, as workers become frustrated with outdated technology.

Waiting for an older PC to start up every day can waste up to 11 hours a year.

Don’t wait until your business PCs slow to a crawl before upgrading. Be proactive. Look for hardware that exceeds your software vendor’s recommended system requirements. This will help ensure your PCs can handle future software upgrades. Then set a regular schedule for upgrading your hardware.

Myth 4: You’re saving money by repairing old PCs

Reality: Repairing or adding RAM to squeeze more life out of older computers may seem economical. But the cost of keeping older PCs running quickly adds up. According to research from J.Gold Associates, repairing breakdowns of a five-year-old computer costs an average of $662 per year. The same research found 43 percent of the small businesses surveyed had PCs that were over five years old – and malfunctioned each year. At that rate, you’d soon be spending more on repairs than on a brand new, more powerful computer.

Besides losing productivity during breakdowns and repairs, older computers are also slower. Using five-year-old PCs can make your employees up to 29 percent less productive, potentially costing your business up to $17,000 per year, per worker.

Small businesses estimated that 34.47 percent of their computers over five years old had been hacked.

Older PCs can also put your business at risk of cyberattacks. Per the J.Gold Associates survey, small businesses estimated that 34.47 percent of their computers over five years old had been hacked. With the average cost of a single data breach worldwide estimated at $35,745 per employee, an older PC rapidly becomes an expensive liability.

In the same survey, small businesses reported that just 5.92 percent of their PCs newer than one year old had experienced cyberattacks. Newer computers frequently offer built-in security features to reduce risk of cyberattacks.

Blindly accepting myths about PCs can be expensive for your small business. Upgrading to more powerful computers can optimise the performance of your business software, enhance your cybersecurity and boost employee productivity. The next time you’re making decisions about computer purchases, be sure you base your actions on reality. Then choose the right PCs to make your business more competitive.

PC Madness Trading Hours​

Monday: 8:00am – 5:30pm

Tuesday: 8:00am – 5:30pm

Wednesday: 8:00am – 5:30pm

Thursday: 8:00am – 5:30pm

Friday: 8:00am – 5:30pm

Saturday: 9:00am – 1:00pm

Sunday: CLOSED

Public Holidays: CLOSED